DNA results and discussions


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 Ethnic origins of the Peacock family.

We have seen that the two Peacocks have very similar DNA signatures for the first 12 Markers e.g.  

14, 25, 15, 10, 11, 14, 12, 12, 10, 13, 11, 31.

These DNA signatures give information as to the origins of the earliest Male ancestor.

The set of Markers (1 to 12) indicate the tribal origin of the family.  For example, Bill Burgar has a DNA signature of

13, 24, 14, 11, 12, 14,1 2, 12, 14, 13, 13, 29.   

This is  typical of a Celtic ancestry.  Most Irish, Welsh and many Scots and English have similar DNA signatures, but will differ in about 3 or 4 markers from Bill’s.  Thus all the Celts are not related directly, but come from similar Celtic stock. 

A DNA signature is referred to as a Haplotype.  All people with a similar signature for the first 12 Markers come from the same genetic stock, and are said to belong to a Haplogroup.  The Celtic Haplogroup is referred to as R1b.

The Peacock DNA signatures are very unusual in England (and Western Europe) and are referred to as Haplogroup R1a. 

The Table below shows the percentage of the population in a country that belongs to the Haplogroups R1b, R1a and I1( i-one)

Country

%   Rb1

%   I1

% R1a

Ireland

90

9

 

Wales

89

6

1

Basques

90

8

 

England

69

19

9

Friesland

56

39

9

Germany

47

34

9

Norway

26

51

18

Sweden

20

54

17

Italy

36

45

3

Russia

27

17

43

Greece

14

45

5

It is seen that the Irish, Welsh, Scots and Basques are predominantly Haplogroup R1b.  In modern times these population groups have been referred to as Celts.  

It can be seen that this ‘Celtic’ DNA signature is very common throughout Western Europe.  It is thought that the tribe having this DNA signature stayed in the Iberian peninsular during the last ice-age. When the ice started to recede, this tribe moved into the rest of Europe in both a northerly and easterly direction.  The occurrence of this Celtic Haplogroup decreases from Western to Eastern Europe and is virtually non-existent in the Asian population. 

At the same time, other tribes were moving into Europe from the East (Asia) and South East (e.g. the Balkans). 

These various tribes intermarried and present day populations of European countries have citizens who originated from these different tribes (different Haplogroups).

This can be seen in the above table that the populations of most countries are derived from a number of different Haplogroups.  For example, the proportion of Celtic (R1b) in Sweden is relatively low and the predominant Haplogroup is I1.  This suggests that Sweden was originally settled by several tribes that have intermarried to form the present day nation.  Each male has a y-chromosome that is the same as that of the tribe from which he is descended

The Peacock family are in the R1a Haplogroup.   This is wide spread over Europe, especially Norway and Sweden, but particularly in Russia.  The present day people with this DNA signature are said to be the Kurgan people of Russia.  Apparently they were one of the earliest people to tame the horse.  This might explain how they managed to travel throughout Europe and settle there; it is suggested this happened several thousand years BC.

How did someone from this tribe arrive in Essex?  I would guess that they were either:

a.             Part of the Viking conquest of Britain in the 800s and maybe arrived from Norway. 

or

b.             Part of the Anglo-Saxon expansion into Britain.  Although the R1a Haplogroup is lower in Denmark and Germany, it is possible that the original Peacock could have come from there.

 

4.         Comparison with other people.

There are world-wide DNA databases of about 25,000 people or more which can be consulted to see if anyone has a similar DNA signature.

For Leslie, at the 12 marker level there are only several persons in the databases with a 12/12 match.

For Alan there is only 1 match at the 12 marker stage.

Thus it can be seen that the Peacocks do not match virtually anyone at even the 12 marker level. 

When one looks at the 37 Marker DNA signatures (in the world-wide DNA databases of about 25,000 people), there is nobody remotely matching the Peacock signatures.  The Peacock family is thus a rarity in terms of its Y-chromosome.  

 

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